NLP Definitions: NLP Business Practitioner

This is a new certification as offered by the Society of NLP, where applications of NLP are targeted at the business arena. All Society of NLP qualification requirements are indicatively the same, with the outcome of helping an individual achieve greater excellence in business and/or entrepreneurship. However, therapeutic elements of this certification are not covered, such as techniques for phobia relief, parts integration, six-step reframes, etc.

NLP Definitions: Linguistics

The study of language structure and process, and can be divided into various parts, including phonology (production of sounds), morphology (structure of words), syntax (structure of sentences), semantics (structure of meanings) as well as pragmatics (meanings created in interaction and social usage).

Most NLP focuses on the semantics of language patterns, whereas a masterful NLP practitioner will realize that most of the meanings are not created in a dictionary but rather through social use within conversation. Students of my NLP Master Practitioner training get an insight into the use of language and linguistics for the purposes of modeling.

NLP Modeling: Building Good Master Practitioners

I’ve recently started a new Master practitioner certification batch. As we know, the Master Practitioner training opens up new ways to look at human behavior at multiple levels, including the way to change meanings through interaction rather than just a static NLP (Milton Model) approach alone.

This has brought me to integrate some elements of core linguistics in order to help Master Practitioners learn about language and the strategies they represent in order to create models effectively.

After all, the principle ability of a Master Practitioner is in his or her ability to view the same thing with deeper and more powerful distinctions. Recently, I worked with this group to watch a well-known speaker who had an online video. Before learning NLP Master Practitioner distinctions and watching the video, patterns were less obvious. After the distinctions were made, it became more apparent that there was a much broader spectrum of elements that could make up the represented model.

As such, we talk about unconscious uptake and conscious design. Master Practitioners of NLP should be able to also create their own approaches to deal with problems at hand, without the worry of breaking rules or that the approach to modeling is “not the right thing”.

Three things I recommend for Master Practitioners. First, to understand that knowledge is not as important as meta knowledge. To achieve success as a masterful practitioner of NLP is to know how you know, to read things from different perspectives, and to engage and disengage with common interpretations flexibly. In so doing, we create new knowledge or at least new representations that imply new things about what we already know.

Second, curiosity. This is something that practitioners know to do, and master practitioners should have even more of. The fact is, many NLP practitioners these days become skeptical. Well, the more important thing to do is to consider what are things that can be learnt from knowledge we already have. What can we experiment with in order to test our ideas?

Third, unconscious delivery. I find that when we second guess ourselves too much we tend to forget things and oftentimes mistake our conscious mind as the only provider of knowledge. In reality, we need to trust our unconscious so much so that you leave behind what does not work and adopt what does work through an unconscious assimilation of capabilities through the modeling process.